Ocean Alliance Returns to Port of Venice

first_imgzoom The Ocean Alliance is restarting its Med-Far East service from the Port of Venice as from May 2017, after the service was stopped last winter because of a structural drop in demand, the port informed.The direct service of the Ocean Alliance, formed by China Cosco Shipping, Evergreen Line, CMA CGM and OOCL, will start with the MN APL Oregon ship arriving on the 10th of May at the Vecon terminal in Venice.As disclosed, the service targets development of the break bulk traffic with the aim of handling up to 2,500 TEU per ship in import and export. The service will employ 10 ships with a capacity of 6,500-6,800 TEU.In addition, Neptune Lines, a company specializing in automotive cargo, focusing on the Mediterranean and Black Sea area, announced it would start adding the Venice Ro-Port MoS to its Adriatic weekly service having concluded a project with FORD Germany.Both services were announced at the Break Bulk fair in Antwerp.Speaking at the event, North Adriatic Sea Port Authority President, Pino Musolino, said that Venice experienced a steady sector growth, recording a 15% increase in last months’ project cargo handling.last_img read more

Jordans Principle – Equal Access

first_imgInFocus on APTN National News:Parliament’s unanimous adoption of Jordan’s Principle was supposed to mean children living on reserve would get the same access to health supports as all other children who live off reserve.But 7 years later families living in First Nation communities still have to fight for equality of services.What are the issues standing in the way?Is the government’s definition of who qualifies fair and reasonable?Representatives from neither Health Canada nor Aboriginal Affairs would go on-camera and answer our questions.But our guests sure have a lot to say!We put Trina Roache’s series, Outside the Circle: the Status of Jordan’s Principle, InFocus.last_img read more

BC premier says wildfires prompted unprecedented second state of emergency

first_imgVANCOUVER – Premier John Horgan says successive B.C. governments have budgeted “laughable” amounts of money to fight wildfires that are becoming all too common through the ravages of climate change.Horgan said Tuesday during a visit to Prince George that the sky in the northern city turned jet black one morning last week from fires burning in nearby communities.“We have serious challenges for public health and we need to adapt our policy making, working with all levels of government to make sure that as we go forward we’re better prepared,” said Horgan, flanked by federal Defence Minister Harjit Sajjan, Mayor Lyn Hall and Grand Chief Ed John of the First Nations Summit.“Clearly, we are going to overshoot the budget again this year, which has happened repeatedly,” Horgan said, adding both federal and provincial governments must ensure adequate resources are available to safeguard communities.He said wildfires prompted an unprecedented second state of emergency in the province in the last 12 months after floods this spring, but he’s confident there’s enough contingency in the budget to provide the needed support.Canadian Armed Forces troops have been deployed to B.C. during the floods and wildfires this year, as well as for fires in 2017.Sajjan said troops have increasingly responded to disasters across Canada as climate change takes a toll on the environment.“We as a government do realize that we need to take steps in terms of how do we mitigate some of these things as we work very closely in trying to reduce our greenhouse gas emissions, do our part as the rest of the world needs to do theirs.”British Columbia budgeted $63 million for wildfire suppression for the 2018-19 season but has already spent $274 million, according to figures from the Forests Ministry. It said last year’s budget allocated the same amount of money, but the firefighting efforts cost $649 million.More than 2,000 evacuees headed to Prince George after being ordered out because of an 850-square-kilometre blaze threatening an area from Fraser Lake to Fort St. James.Smoke from distant wildfires is forcing residents in parts of the province to stay indoors, especially if they have pre-existing conditions such as asthma, and tourism is being affected where skies are hazy.Teck Resources temporarily shut down its lead smelting operations in Trail, saying a supplier plant that provides oxygen is closed due to poor air quality that is affecting lead smelting.As part of the city’s wildfire prevention program that started in 2005, Hall said the community will discuss what steps it can take to mitigate future wildfires, including clearing the forest floor of debris.Lori Daniels, an ecology professor at the University of British Columbia’s faculty of forestry, said only about one third of B.C. communities have wildfire prevention plans though the risk of such disasters is increasing.She said it’s time for the public to support initiatives including tree removal in forests close to homes as climate change creates hotter, drier conditions after decades of fire suppression policies that led to an accumulation of dead trees and twigs that act as fuel for fires that can quickly get out of control.“This is an issue for all of us who live near burnable vegetation, which is pretty much a large proportion of Canadians, even in urban areas where we have forests that could catch on fire with these extreme weather conditions,” Daniels said.Community wildfire prevention plans would assess hazards, including small and big trees that need to be cut down in areas where homes are built close to forested areas, she said.“In many places in B.C., the forests adjacent to communities are so dense that even when you drop water on them from a water bomber the water all stays at the top of the trees and never makes it to the ground where the fire is travelling.”Logan Lake fire Chief Daniel Leighton said the community began a wildfire prevention program with provincial grants after extensive fires in the province in 2003 during a record-dry summer.He said the current program involves youth employed through a summer job-creation initiative that has them trimming branches and picking up debris to rid the forest floor of fuel.Between 150 to 180 hectares have been treated by hand since 2003 though small amounts of land are also clearcut, he said, adding that part of the program was a “hard sell” for people opposed to logging that’s done through a corporation set up to put money back into the community.“Once you start cutting down trees and thinning them down some people don’t like it, although they don’t like the fires either. But the last few years have been an awakening for some people.”He said public meetings provided residents with information about the benefits of the program that has attracted attention from other jurisdictions wanting to follow suit, including Colorado, Ontario and elsewhere in B.C., where similar but much smaller programs exist in a few areas including Kamloops, Merritt and some ski resorts.— Follow @CamilleBains1 on Twitter.last_img read more

DeVos reinstates forprofit college watchdog cut under Obama

first_imgEducation Secretary Betsy DeVos is restoring federal recognition of an accrediting group that oversees dozens of for-profit colleges but was shut down by the Obama administration.Her decision released Wednesday says the Accrediting Council for Independent Colleges and Schools passed muster in 19 of 21 areas reviewed. DeVos says she is restoring the group’s recognition and giving it a year to fix lingering problems.The group, known as ACICS, was responsible for ensuring the quality of 250 institutions before the Obama administration cut ties with it in 2016, alleging poor oversight.It had previously certified now-defunct for-profit chains including Corinthian Colleges and ITT Technical Institute.A judge ordered DeVos to revisit the case in March after ACICS sued, saying the previous administration failed to consider thousands of pages of evidence.Collin Binkley, The Associated Presslast_img read more

General Motors product development chief named president

first_imgDETROIT — General Motors has promoted product development chief Mark Reuss (Royce) to company president.The longtime GM engineer replaces Dan Ammann, who is now CEO of GM’s autonomous vehicle unit called Cruise Automation.Reuss will continue to lead product development and the Cadillac luxury brand, which he took on last year. In his new job, he’ll also head the company’s quality organization.Reuss has been with the company for his entire career starting as an intern in 1983. In the past he has run operations in North America and Australia as well as GM’s engineering unit.GM says he has been leading a transformation of the company’s product development workforce to improve quality and speed up bringing new vehicles to market.The Associated Presslast_img read more

Fort St John Hospital Foundation to celebrate 25th Anniversary

first_imgTours will start at 4:00 p.m. and run until 5:00 p.m., with the ceremony taking place from 5:00 p.m. to 6:00 p.m.The Hospital Foundation’s 25th Anniversary Celebration is taking place on February 21 at the Fort St. John Hospital Lobby.For more information, you can call the Foundation at 250-261-7564. FORT ST. JOHN, B.C. – The Fort St. John Hospital Foundation will be holding an evening of celebration in honour of the Foundation’s 25th Anniversary.The evening will include speeches, music performances, and tours of the Hospital.Light refreshments and cake will be served.last_img read more

Thundershower predicted in parts of Bengal today

first_imgKolkata: The Regional Meteorological Centre at Alipore has predicted thundershower in some South Bengal districts as well as parts of North Bengal, on Monday.According to a senior official of the MeT office, there may be intermittent rainfall in the evening hours in several parts of South Bengal, particularly in the Western districts, due to the impact of Nor’wester. There is a prediction of heavy rainfall in North Bengal on Monday. The intensity of rainfall may go up in some districts of North Bengal on Tuesday. People in the districts of West Midnapore, East Midnapore, Birbhum, Bankura and Purulia may witness gusty wind accompanying the rain. In case of South Bengal the situation may improve from Tuesday, a weather expert predicted. “A low pressure trough has been created over Bay-of-Bengal, which will bring some rainfall in various parts of South Bengal. The low pressure zone is situated at a distance of 1.5 km from the surface,” a senior official from the MeT office said. The weather office also said that people will get some respite from the scorching summer heat as the temperature may drop by a few notches following the rains. During daytime, the humidity remains high in various South Bengal districts including the city, as a result of which people are witnessing a high level of discomfort. It may be mentioned here that mercury has started soaring in the past couple of days. The temperature may hover around 25-30 degree Celsius in various districts during daytime. The sky may remain overcast in some parts of South Bengal, including the city, on Monday afternoon. However, there may be moderate to heavy rainfall in some parts of North Bengal. It may be mentioned here that rains accompanied by thunderstorm lashed some parts of North Bengal on Sunday morning.last_img read more

Centenarian voters to be treated like VVIPs on polling day Delhi CEO

first_imgNEW DELHI: Special arrangements would be made for Delhi voters who are aged 100 and above on the polling day, including pick-up and drop facility, and they will be greeted at booths with bouquets and selfies to make them “feel like VVIPs”. Delhi goes to polls on May 12 and Chief Electoral Officer Ranbir Singh said, there are 96 centenarian voters in the city, and women outnumber men in this category. “We have been trying for the last four months to identify all voters who are aged 100 or above. This is a first such initiative to cater to elderly voters who were born before Independence and have seen the first general elections in 1952. For us, they are VVIP voters and they will be treated as one,” said, Ranbir Singh. Also Read – Odd-Even: CM seeks transport dept’s views on exemption to women, two wheelers, CNG vehiclesAccording to data shared by the Delhi CEO Office, there are 42 male centenarian voters and 54 female. “A senior officer will go to the house of each of these centenarian voters, residing nearest to the polling station in a constituency, and escort them to booths. They will also motivate them to vote unless they are bedridden and their health doesn’t permit,” the CEO said. “But, if such voters are still eager to vote despite their frailty, we will make all possible arrangements, to ensure they exercise their franchise. They will also be given priority in voting, so they don’t have to stand in line,” he said. Also Read – More good air days in Delhi due to Centre’s steps: JavadekarAt polling stations they will be greeted with bouquets and polling staff would take selfies with them, Singh said. Among the centenarian voters on the electoral roll are 111-year-old Bachchan Singh, a resident of West Delhi’s Tilak Nagar and 110-year-old Ram Pyari Shankwar, who is suffering from age-related ailments for the last one decade and lives in East Delhi’s Kondli. “He has never missed out on voting as far as I can remember as he understands the value of even one ballot. He barely remembers things now since he suffered a stroke couple of months ago, though, he is able to walk and speak. So we will take him to the polling booth,” Bachchan Singh’s grandson, Gurucharan Singh, said. The Delhi CEO said, in keeping with the theme of ‘Accessible Elections’, proper facilities would be provided to the voter with disabilities. “For visually-challenged voters, a dummy sheet would be kept at the polling station, on which they can feel and get to know about the candidates, and the serial number before exercising their franchise,” Singh said. A facility for having a companion is also there, besides, wheelchair and ramp facilities would be provided for such voters. As many as 164 candidates are in the fray in Delhi, where the polls are largely being seen as a triangular contest among the AAP, BJP and the Congress. Of the over 1.43 crore voters in Delhi, 78,73,022 are male and 64,42,762 female, while 669 belong to the third gender. The number of overseas electors stands at 40 while the count of service voters is 11,005.last_img read more

The 1 Passion propels walkon Eddie Days

Eddie Days doesn’t look much like a basketball player. Generously listed at 6 feet, and weighing 180 pounds, the stocky Days looks more like he should be playing running back for Jim Tressel than guard for Thad Matta. But Eddie is more passionate about basketball than most people are about anything. He simply loves the game. At Richmond Heights High School near Cleveland, Eddie was a star. As a senior in 2006, he averaged 22 points, six rebounds and five assists per game, and was named first-team All-Ohio. But despite all of his success, he still didn’t have any Division I scholarship offers. Eddie had opportunities to play for Division II or Division III schools, but that wasn’t what he had in mind. Even when Eddie was young, he said his dream was to play basketball for the Buckeyes. “I always wanted to come (to Ohio State). My dad came here. All my family lives here in Columbus,” Eddie said. “I couldn’t imagine going anywhere else.” Unbeknownst to Matta and his staff, Eddie decided to pay his way and try to walk on the basketball team at OSU. He loved the game too much to stay away. “Even before tryouts my freshman year, I would play ball at the RPAC probably five hours a day,” Eddie said. “Not even just to stay in shape or just because I knew I was trying out, but just because I loved playing.” After those daily, five-hour sessions, he’d hit the weights. “If I didn’t play ball,” Eddie said, “I was having a bad day.” When the day of the tryouts came, Eddie walked up to the Schottenstein Center and, along with 11 other guys, ran a few drills and scrimmaged for about a half-hour. The whole process lasted about 45 minutes. That was it. Everything Days worked for came down to that moment. “Right after tryouts were over, Jamar Butler, Daequan Cook and David (Lighty) were in there watching tryouts,” Eddie said. “Jamar came up to me afterwards and said: ‘The coaches like you. They think you’re probably going to be the one.’” Eddie made the squad. “He was just so, so excited,” said Judie Days, Eddie’s mother. “I can’t explain how excited he was.” Eddie planned to take the bus straight back to his residence hall, but that didn’t exactly happen. “I ended up just sitting on the bus for like an hour, just riding and kind of reflecting on how I played that day,” Eddie said. “I’d probably have to say that would be my favorite memory.” But his happiness was short-lived. During his junior year of high school, Eddie passed out during a morning basketball practice. After running a battery of tests, the doctors at the Cleveland Clinic discovered he had a rare heart condition. Days was put on medication and had no problems following the fainting incident, but OSU doctors didn’t want to take any chances. They wanted to take a closer look at the problem. By the time the doctors were satisfied and cleared Eddie to play, the roster was full. Eddie was denied his chance to be a part of the team. “That was really devastating,” Judie said. “That was really hard for him and (his family).” After being let down, Eddie wouldn’t let up. He kept up with his daily marathon gym sessions, and even started helping the women’s basketball team practice to get more gym time. Though Eddie wasn’t able to play for the men’s team, the way he played during tryouts earned their respect. Former Buckeye guard Jon Diebler has known Eddie since 2007, and said the team thought highly of him. “Eddie’s a guy who has always been around the program, and whenever we would have open gyms Eddie was welcome to come and play,” Diebler said. “Even when he wasn’t on the team, he would still come and play because we knew the type of player he was.” When Eddie came back in 2007, the roster was full and the team didn’t hold tryouts. The following year there was a tryout, but the team ultimately decided not to take anyone. Three years had passed, and Eddie still wasn’t where he wanted to be. Some thought it was time for him to try something else, but he refused to give up. “I even asked him at one point. I said, ‘Well, would you maybe want to think about going into coaching?’ But he said, ‘No, I want to play,’” Judie said. “He was adamant.” So for a fourth consecutive year, Eddie attended tryouts. This time, he made it. “It finally worked out,” Eddie said. “I think they just wanted somebody who would play hard and understand that if they make the team, they may not play a lot, but they still have to bring it every day in practice. And I understood that.” Eddie was a practice player, and said he loved it. “My role was to bring it every day in practice. Especially this year, with five or six freshmen, just to kind of be a leader and show them how things are done and lead by example,” Eddie said. “I think it helps when you play hard on scout teams and the practice team against the starters. It really helps them out.” Eddie was routinely matched up with some of the best players in college basketball. His first year, he was in charge of checking Evan Turner in practice. This year, he guarded William Buford, Diebler and Lighty. “Eddie’s a guy who’s really strong, so he would be really physical with us and he did a great job of guarding us,” Diebler said. “He would challenge a lot of our shots, and I know by him guarding, you know, myself, Dave and Will, it made us better.” Eddie said he loved the opportunity. “I loved playing and practicing against NBA-caliber players every day,” he said. “The things I’ve learned from these coaches and the times we had together, you know, with my teammates and everything, we really became like a family. Especially this year.” Eddie didn’t get a chance to play in many games, but on March 20, with about three minutes left in the Buckeyes’ pummeling of George Mason in the third round of the NCAA Tournament, the OSU faithful at Quicken Loans Arena in Cleveland started a chant. It was quiet at first, but continued to gain volume. “Ehh-dee, Ehh-dee, Ehh-dee,” the crowd chanted. Shortly thereafter, Matta relented to the crowd’s request, and Eddie entered the biggest tournament in college basketball. “The Eddie chant,” Judie said. “I just could not believe it.” Eddie was fouled at the end of the game, and was sent to the foul line where, in front of his hometown and many members of his family, he hit one of two free-throw attempts for the first and only point in his collegiate career. “For me, (the free throw) felt like 20 points,” Judie said. Eddie wasn’t as excited as his mom, but still enjoyed the moment. “I had a lot of friends and family there,” he said. “It was definitely a good night.” Eddie said he’s definitely going to miss playing for the Buckeyes, but he’s going to miss the people on the team and the times they had most of all. “We were really like brothers,” he said. “It doesn’t matter where we are or what we’re doing; it was always a good time, a lot of laughs.” Diebler remembers Eddie being a fierce pingpong competitor, sometimes showing up 90 minutes before practice just to play a few games and be with the guys. Although Diebler claims to be the pingpong king, Eddie could hold his own. “He was definitely top-five,” Diebler said. Though the experience ended abruptly, and ultimately short of the team’s lofty goals, Eddie said he doesn’t regret a second of it. “I’m really going to miss the program,” he said. “It hasn’t really hit me yet that it’s over.” Now, Eddie will focus on finishing his last quarter at OSU, from which he plans to graduate in June with a degree in consumer sciences and a minor in business. But don’t be surprised if you see him tearing up the RPAC sometime soon, you know, for old times’ sake. read more

Buckeye seniors instilling values skills in underclassmen future of the program

As the Ohio State men’s Lacrosse team trotted off the field following Saturday’s win against Hobart, each player beamed from ear to ear. Amid pats on the back and laughter, one could detect a sense of appreciation and gratitude from the younger members of the team toward the upperclassmen on Senior Day. The team, at first glance, seems to be dominated by youngsters, as much of the glitz and glamour is cast toward the statistical leaders on the team. Sophomore Logan Schuss leads the team in scoring, trailed by classmate Jeff Tundo. The team’s leader in assists is freshman Tyler Frederick, and freshman goalkeeper Greg Dutton has been nothing short of spectacular in the cage this season. The seniors, however, have been critical in their roles for the team. Aside from their four years of contributions on the field, which include a conference championship in 2008, shepherding the young players’ development has been key. “I think it’s our role to show our experience and let them know how things are in Division 1 lacrosse,” senior middleman Paul Beery said. “A lot of them have stepped up and played an integral role, so I would say we’ve been successful.” Even with 12 seniors on the roster, looking over such a large quantity of young players can still be difficult, senior middleman Scott Lathrop said. “It’s tough when you’ve got 45 guys and they are at all different age levels,” Lathrop said. “You’re trying to funnel them all into one focus.” Lathrop said he approaches the job by consistently working hard and leading by example for the younger players. He also said he will sit down and talk with the players if they need it. Beyond the seniors’ job in helping with the younger players, Lathrop sees a bond that has developed among the seniors over four years. “We all came in at the same time, and we’ve seen several different shades of this program,” Lathrop said. “We’ve been through tough times together and good times together. We have shared a special experience here.” With the season well past midpoint, and graduation quickly approaching, the seniors will begin to mull over their future beyond lacrosse. Lathrop plans to embark to Europe on a two-month internship, and Beery plans to pursue a degree to become a Certified Public Accountant. Senior captain Bryce Woodson has a more laid-back approach to his pursuits after college for the time being. “I’m just going to take a little time off and enjoy life a little bit,” Woodson said with a smile. Though Senior Day is over, there is still much at stake to add to the memories for the seniors. A shot at the Eastern College Athletic Conference still exists, and there are four games left in the regular season. “I’m very happy for these seniors right now,” OSU coach Nick Myers said after the team’s win against Hobart. “We’re going to keep taking it one game at a time, though, and continue to improve.” One game remaining is the Showdown in the ‘Shoe, in which the lacrosse team will face Fairfield in Ohio Stadium before the Spring Game on April 23. Lathrop said this game is particularly exciting. “Playing in the ‘Shoe gives you chills every time,” he said. “It will be a special experience. Hopefully we can get as many people out there as we can.” As the seniors’ careers wind down, Lathrop, Beery and Woodson say they plan on staying in touch with their teammates. “I’m going to try my best,” Lathrop said. “These guys are my best friends.” read more