Pet adoption event in Glenville was terrific

first_imgI would like to thank the folks who put together the Yager’s Fall in Love Pet Adoption event in Glenville on Oct. 7.Several pet shelters participated and all were very friendly and happy to provide adoption advice for those looking for a pet. I was very lucky to visit the Animal Protection Foundation’s adoptees and to take home Figaro (Figgy), a wonderful male cat, who is already a cherished member of my family.Anne BarkleyGuilderland Categories: Letters to the Editor, Opinion More from The Daily Gazette:Albany County warns of COVID increaseEDITORIAL: Thruway tax unfair to working motoristsEDITORIAL: Urgent: Today is the last day to complete the censusEDITORIAL: Find a way to get family members into nursing homesFoss: Should main downtown branch of the Schenectady County Public Library reopen?last_img read more

Congress’ failure to re-up on child health care funding shows its striking ineptitude

first_imgDemocrats rightly objected, leading to the current impasse. It is possible that CHIP will feature in a big compromise funding package that keeps the government open, raises unrelated federal spending caps and perhaps even determines the fate of the “dreamers,” undocumented immigrants brought to the United States when they were children.The sooner Congress settles all of these issues, the better. Yet the fact would remain: Funding CHIP should be routine business, and it has instead been over the past year a desperate, last-minute mess.Politicians often decry Washington “dysfunction” when what they really mean is that their party cannot get its own way.But to much of the public, it is episodes such as the CHIP debacle that are the problem.More from The Daily Gazette:EDITORIAL: Thruway tax unfair to working motoristsEDITORIAL: Urgent: Today is the last day to complete the censusEDITORIAL: Beware of voter intimidationEDITORIAL: Find a way to get family members into nursing homesFoss: Should main downtown branch of the Schenectady County Public Library reopen? The example of the moment is the ongoing saga of the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP).This is a popular service that covers 9 million young Americans — and that is rapidly running out of cash, alarming families that rely on the federal aid to keep their children healthy. Democrats and Republicans in Congress created CHIP in 1997 to assist families who make too much to qualify for Medicaid, the health-insurance program for the poor, yet who do not have reasonable alternative options for insuring their children.Given that decent health care Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP), a popular service that covers 9 million young Americans — and that is rapidly running out of cash in early years is crucial, lawmakers rightly decided to invest in the nation’s future health.The program has been a remarkable success, driving children’s uninsured rate down to about 4 percent. But, unlike Medicaid, Congress did not make CHIP an entitlement program that automatically and perpetually draws as much money as it needs from the treasury.Rather, it required lawmakers to regularly re-up CHIP’s funding, which they did in 2015, under the reasonable assumption that Congress would not want to be blamed for kicking children off their insurance.The 2015 funding dried up in September. Lawmakers pumped in enough emergency funds to sustain the program for only a few months. States have begun planning for a funding shortage, with some warning families that their coverage might lapse.The disruption uselessly alarms parents, scrambles doctors’ planning and eats up time state officials could use for more important things.House Republicans might feel as though they already did their job; the chamber passed a CHIP funding bill back in November.But the proposal would have siphoned money from a preventive-care fund created under Obamacare.Unsurprisingly, given the fund’s provenance, Republicans have criticized how the fund’s money has been spent.In fact, agencies such as the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention haveused the fund to invest in vaccinations, diabetes programs and anti-tobacco efforts.Reprogramming its money to fund CHIP would rob Peter to pay Paul.center_img Categories: Editorial, OpinionThe following editorial appeared in The Washington Post:Disagreement in Congress is not necessarily a sign of dysfunction.But when both parties broadly agree that something should happen yet serially fail to follow through, the nation’s leaders look particularly inept.last_img read more

Union fees protect all workers’ rights

first_imgCategories: Letters to the Editor, Opinion Here’s a thought. If Mr. Mark Janus can refrain from paying union dues because he disagrees with what they do, despite having benefited from what that union and all of the other unions have accomplished during the past 100 years, does that mean I can stop paying taxes because I disagree with what is being done through federal foreign and domestic policies? Can I refuse to pay local taxes because I wish my street was more adequately plowed? Sometimes, for the greater benefit, our individual concerns need to be subordinate.This isn’t to say that the members of the unions shouldn’t be trying to mold union policy or that reforms within unions should not be sought. It doesn’t mean that union corruption shouldn’t be prosecuted.However, this isn’t what this issue is really about. Anti-union forces, which are being led and financed by interests who don’t want to pay people what they are worth in wages, retirements and safety, would like to create an economic oligarchy. Unions, imperfect though they may be, keep that effort in check. The American middle class was born on the back of unions, just like the eight-hour workday and any number of other worker protections.James CiminoSchenectadyMore from The Daily Gazette:Troopers: Schenectady pair possessed heroin, crack cocaine in Orange County Thruway stopSchenectady police reform sessions pivot to onlineFoss: Should main downtown branch of the Schenectady County Public Library reopen?EDITORIAL: Urgent: Today is the last day to complete the censusEDITORIAL: Beware of voter intimidationlast_img read more

Foss: The minimum wage is going up, and that’s good

first_imgI’m also a proponent of requiring higher minimum wages in areas with higher median incomes, as New York does. A $15 minimum wage by the end of 2018 makes far more sense for New York City — one of the most dynamic metropolitan areas in the country — than it does for upstate New York, where growth has generally lagged. Giving upstate more time to phase in this higher rate of pay is sound policy, even if the legislation’s called for an indexed schedule raises questions about how long it will be before we see a $15 minimum wage here in the Capital Region. New research on the impact of recent minimum wage increases indicate that the job losses opponents warned would be a consequence of raising the wage floor have yet to materialize. One study, which examined data from the first major cities to raise their minimum wage above $10 an hour — Washington, Chicago, Seattle, San Francisco, Oakland and San Jose — found that a higher minimum wage raised worker pay without reducing employment. A more recent study, focused solely on Seattle, found that the city’s decision to raise the minimum wage to $15 an hour had mixed results. More experienced workers earned more money, while people seeking to enter the labor market struggled to find jobs. As to whether minimum wage increases are inspiring employers to replace their workers with robots, well, it’s complicated.  Low-wage workers throughout the state can expect to receive fatter paychecks in the coming year, which is something to celebrate. The cost of living is always rising, and more money will make it easier for people to get by. Under the legislation signed by Gov. Andrew Cuomo two years ago, the entire state is expected to move toward a $15 minimum wage, the goal set by activists pushing for better pay for workers at the lowest rungs of the economy. In New York City, the minimum wage for large employers will jump from $13 an hour to $15 an hour on Dec. 31; for employers with 10 employees or less, it will jump from $12 an hour to $13.50. In Long Island and Westchester County, the minimum wage will climb from $12 an hour to $13 an hour. Upstate, the minimum wage will rise from $10.40 an hour to $11.10.The increases won’t stop there. By the end of 2019, New York City’s smaller employers are expected to pay their workers $15, while Long Island and Westchester County employers are expected to pay their employees $15 an hour by the end of 2021. North of Westchester County, the minimum wage will rise to $12.50 by the end of 2020, after which it will increase to $15 on an indexed schedule to be set by the director of the Division of Budget in consultation with the Department of Labor. I’ve always thought raising the minimum wage gradually to something more akin to a living wage made a great deal of sense.  Categories: OpinionWhile traveling over Christmas, I had my first encounter with a McDonald’s self-service kiosk.  Right now, the economy is strong and many employers are looking for reliable workers. But employers are always looking for ways to cut labor costs, and self-service kiosks and other automated devices will likely appeal to them.Which doesn’t mean we shouldn’t raise the minimum wage or pay low-wage workers more money.It means that we should be on guard for unintended consequences, and make whatever adjustments need to be made. The state’s slow and steady approach to raising the wage floor allows for this, and that’s good policy.  In the meantime, I plan to continue my personal policy of avoiding self-service checkout counters and kiosks whenever I can, because I’d rather deal with a human earning $15 an hour than a machine aimed at putting that human out of work.It’s a small gesture, but it’s one I’m happy to make. Reach Sara Foss at [email protected] Opinions expressed here are her own and not necessarily the newspaper’s. More from The Daily Gazette:EDITORIAL: Find a way to get family members into nursing homesEDITORIAL: Thruway tax unfair to working motoristsEDITORIAL: Beware of voter intimidationEDITORIAL: Urgent: Today is the last day to complete the censusFoss: Should main downtown branch of the Schenectady County Public Library reopen? My immediate instinct was to walk out the door and find a restaurant where a human being would take my order. But we were in a hurry and finding another place to eat seemed like more trouble than it was worth. A McDonald’s employee offered guidance (“is this your first time using one of our self-service kiosks?”) and we placed our order, albeit reluctantly. “It doesn’t seem any faster or more efficient than ordering from a person,” my husband grumbled. I generally avoid automated technology when I’m shopping, preferring to make my purchases the old-fashioned way than with a machine that never seems to work quite as well as advertised. As I waited for my food, I wondered whether we’ll soon see more self-service kiosks in restaurants and stores. New York’s minimum wage is set to rise at year’s end, and while I support paying workers more, I don’t support replacing them with robots. Fortunately, research assessing the impact of raising the minimum wage, as New York has been doing since 2016, suggests that concerns about job losses have been overblown. last_img read more

Manchester projects win five-year battle

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Leisure: Cardiff – city of culture

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Another Brindleyplace for Birmingham?

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Can Parkview power it up?

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Government forms team with businesspeople, labor groups to discuss omnibus bill

first_imgCoordinating Economic Minister Airlangga Hartarto was scheduled to submit a presidential letter (Surpres) notifying the House about the deliberations over the bill, as well as the bill itself, on Tuesday, according to several lawmakers.The minister, however, failed to show up, prolonging the government’s failure to meet its own deadline for submitting the bill. He was then scheduled to submit the bill on Wednesday.Contacted separately, Confederation of Indonesian Trade Unions (KSPI) president Said Iqbal said the newly formed team did not involve the labor groups much; it instead had a tendency to divide them.”We rejected an invitation to join the team unless the team involved more labor groups and was tasked with discussing each of the articles in the omnibus bill before they are submitted to the House,” Said told the Post. “We do not want to only be a legitimation tool.” Secretary to the coordinating economic minister Susiwijono Moegiarso said that businesspeople and labor representatives had agreed to join the team.”We are planning to have a meeting on Thursday to talk about the schedule and work plan,” he told the Post without providing further details.Indonesian Chamber of Commerce and Industry (Kadin) vice chairwoman for international relations Shinta Widjaja Kamdani said the team’s discussions on the bill would be held simultaneously with its deliberations at the House of Representatives.If passed into law, the omnibus bill on job creation is expected to amend more than 1,000 provisions in some 80 prevailing laws, including the Labor Law, which is deemed to have stifled investment. However, labor unions have expressed their opposition to the bill, saying it would undermine labor rights. The government has set up a team comprising government officials, businesspeople and labor representatives tasked with coordinating deliberations and public consultations over an omnibus bill on job creation.According to Coordinating Economic Ministerial Regulation No. 121/2020, a copy of which was obtained by The Jakarta Post on Tuesday, the ministry set up on Feb. 7 a team of 14 labor representatives, 12 business representatives and 19 government officials.”The team is tasked to discuss labor issues on the omnibus bill on job creation,” the regulation reads. “[It will also] consult with the public regarding labor issues.”center_img Topics :last_img read more

PREMIUMSupreme Court inundated with cases amid shortage of justices

first_imgForgot Password ? Topics : Facebook Log in with your social account The Supreme Court has said it has been inundated by an increasing number of cases as it struggles with a shortage of justices.“Currently, the ratio between the number of judges and the cases we receive is not ideal,” Supreme Court spokesman Abdullah told The Jakarta Post on Monday. “We typically receive around 20,000 cases each year that must be handled by around 40 Supreme Court justices. So you can imagine how overwhelmed we have been.”The country’s top court produced 20,058 rulings in 2019 compared to 17,638 in 2018, lifting its productivity rate to almost 99 percent from 95 percent the preceding year. Ninety-six percent, or more than 19,000, of the rulings were made in less than three months from the time the cases were received by the court.With its lack of justices, the court considers this an accomplishme… LOG INDon’t have an account? Register here Linkedin Google Supreme-Court #SupremeCourt judges #JudicialReform Judicial-Commission judicial-systemlast_img read more