ANC plans to withdraw South Africa from the ICC

first_imgSouth Africa plans to leave the International Criminal Court. The announcement came Sunday during the ruling ANC’s National General Council. Earlier, the ruling party had said it believes the court serves no purpose.The South African government faces criticism for ignoring a court order to arrest Sudan’s president when he visited the country earlier this year.Obed Bapela said the ICC had “lost its direction” and the ruling African National Congress (ANC) wanted to withdraw the country from it.The Sudanese president, Omar al-Bashir, who has been accused of genocide and war crimes, visited South Africa in June and was allowed to leave despite a court order to detain him.Last week the government asked the ICC for more time to explain why it allowed this. But this weekend the ruling party resolved to leave the court.Bapela said powerful nations “trample” human rights and pursue “selfish interests”. He added: “South Africa still holds the flag of human rights, we are not lowering it.”Parliament will now debate ICC membership. The ANC commands a comfortable majority in the legislature, with more than 60% of the vote.African Union (AU) has termed the International Criminal Court as biased against prosecuting Africans and therefore commending South Africa for taking the initiative to withdraw from the court.AU has made it clear that it is up to individual nations to make the decision to withdraw or not, with at least 30 African countries being members of the ICClast_img read more

After nearly quitting, Christina Oyawale uses volleyball to form legacy

first_img Facebook Twitter Google+ Published on October 22, 2018 at 11:06 pm Contact Andrew: arcrane@syr.edu | @CraneAndrew Christina Oyawale was minutes away from quitting volleyball her senior year of high school.She showed up to practice at Parkdale (Maryland) High School not dressed to play and told Christine Johnson and Madeline Sease, her two coaches, that she was leaving to interview for a job at Checkers.“College wasn’t really an option in my mind,” Oyawale said. “It was more of just graduating, getting a job, and then paying.”Johnson and Sease were shocked. They saw potential in her athletic frame and passion for the game that Oyawale didn’t, and were not going to put up with her decision to leave and flip hamburgers.“I’m looking at her [in that moment] and I’m like, ‘Girl, you’re going to get a scholarship to go to college,’” Sease said. “‘What are you talking about you’re going to quit and get a job at Checkers?’”AdvertisementThis is placeholder textFive years later, Oyawale, now a redshirt senior at Syracuse, has become a mentor for both her teammates at SU and students at Parkdale. After missing time this season because of an ankle injury, Oyawale has put herself in position to cement her legacy at Parkdale and Syracuse by leading the Orange to their first NCAA tournament appearance in program history.But her career at SU almost never started. Prince George’s County, the Maryland county bordering the eastern side of Washington, D.C. where Oyawale grew up, isn’t a breeding place for Division I volleyball players. It’s a place where a “for fun” attitude exists, Johnson said, often resulting in mediocre results.“Coming to Parkdale, you didn’t have that winning mentality,” Johnson said. “Just to be on the team was fine with them.”Oyawale didn’t play volleyball until her freshman year of high school. When Johnson and Sease saw Oyawale play for the first time, there was no doubt in their minds that they would convince her to play volleyball.Anna Henderson | Digital Design EditorBut the path to college seemed unlikely. Her parents couldn’t afford it. The night Oyawale tried to quit, Johnson spoke to Oyawale’s father, Kunle Oyawale in Parkdale’s parking lot. Her message to him was that she wasn’t going to invest the time in his daughter if she couldn’t commit herself. The coach had instilled in Parkdale’s program a “no-nonsense, give all you have or nothing” attitude, but that night, the Oyawales saw a different side of the longtime coach.Johnson said it was a time that she didn’t have to be so mean. But she explained to Kunle he should see his daughter play.“Yes ma’am,” Johnson said Kunle responded, and he exited his car to watch Oyawale.“He hasn’t stopped (coming) since,” Johnson said. In order to get noticed by college coaches, Oyawale had to take the next step to club volleyball. Though money remained a problem, Kunle sold his car to afford to put Oyawale on a team.Oyawale led Parkdale to a 10-6 record in her senior year, and her raw talent and passion for the game made her a potential recruit. The night before she was supposed to visit Syracuse, Oyawale stood with her cousin in Parkdale’s hallway after watching a school basketball game. Outside, a snowstorm brewed, and Oyawale called Yelin to tell him that she wouldn’t be able to make her official visit. On the spot, she said, Yelin offered her a scholarship.“‘We believe this is something that you really want to do, and if you want it, it’s yours,’” Oyawale said Yelin told her.She accepted immediately. Oyawale chose the No. 9 because of her May 9 birthday, nine-pound birth weight, and way she drew stick figures as a child. M’kaela White, who Oyawale helped mentor at Parkdale and now plays volleyball at James Madison, also wears the No. 9.Oyawale is a first-generation Nigerian, with both of her parents born in Nigeria. At home, they don’t call their daughter “Christina,” and instead use her given name. Oyawale says that her life outside of Syracuse is surrounded by Nigerian culture, from the food she eats to the friends she hangs out with. Sometimes, in practice, she jokingly uses an accent to throw her teammates off.Seven of SU’s players are from outside of the United States, representing six different countries. Though Yelin said Oyawale’s play remains raw at times, the redshirt senior helped them adapt to the United States’ culture and college life. Yuliia Yastrub, a sophomore from Ukraine, said the toughest part for her is the language and how to act around others, but credits her teammates, such as Oyawale, for the transition.In the 2016 season, there were no seniors on the SU roster, and the then-redshirt sophomore found herself in a mentoring role despite her limited experience. Oyawale calls SU a family, and she’s the big sister.Oyawale took a visit to Sease last spring, and walked in during one of Sease’s health classes at Parkdale. Sease’s students all wanted to be professional athletes, she said, and Oyawale took the time to break down her routine to them, touching on everything from what her training and academic schedules are to how early she wakes up each morning.Many of Sease’s students don’t have the work ethic to make it past high school, she said. They have no idea what their dream career holds. Six years after she nearly quit volleyball, Oyawale stood in a leadership role and guided them.“I think skill is something you can work at, and anyone can get that,” Oyawale said, “but your heart and your passion for the game, that’s something you can’t just get overnight.” Commentslast_img read more

Purdue vs. Tennessee results: Boilermakers survive Vols’ comeback in Sweet 16 OT thriller

first_imgMORE: Watch NCAA Tournament basketball live with fuboTV (7-day trial)Check out the scores and highlights that made this Sweet 16 matchup one of the best games of the 2019 NCAA Tournament: Purdue vs. Tennessee: Live score, highlights10 p.m.:  Some final stats from this game: Purdue shot 54 percent from the field and 48.4 percent from 3-point land (15 of 31). Carsen Edwards had a game-leading 29 points, but Ryan Cline (27) absolutely kept the Boilermakers in the game late thanks to a handful of clutch 3-pointers. Grant Williams and Admiral Schofield both tie for the team lead for Tennessee with 21 points. 9:59 p.m.:  Looks like that’ll do it. Purdue has a 99-92 lead with 6.8 left. Not enough time for a comeback. Admiral Schofield finishes with one final, uncontested dunk. Boilermakers are heading back to the Elite Eight for the first time since 2000.9:54 p.m.:  If Tennessee loses this game, it will be because of its horrid free throw shooting. The Vols are 14 of 28. 9:52 p.m.: Carsen Edwards hits both his free throws to make it 94-87 Tennessee. Grant Williams attempts a 3-pointer, misses, then fouls out with 52 seconds left. He finishes with a team-high 21 points.9:51 p.m.:  Jordan Bowden fouls out for the Vols now. He finishes with 16 points.9:49 p.m.:  Matt Haarms and Grant Williams trade slams to make it 81-86 with 1:13 remaining. Tennessee needs a defensive stand and some clutch points here.Purdue with the SLAM! 😤 #Sweet16 #MarchMadness | @BoilerBall pic.twitter.com/SNe3Um1mT9— NCAA March Madness (@marchmadness) March 29, 20199:48 p.m.: Purdue’s Ryan Cline called for a foul away from the ball — he’s out, too. Purdue leads 89-84 with two minutes remaining.9:46 p.m.: Tennessee’s Kyle Alexander fouled out after attempting an offensive rebound. Not good for the Vols considering the inside presence Matt Haarms commands.9:40 p.m.:  Matt Haarms opens the overtime scoring 1 for 2 at the charity stripe. Purdue leads 83-82.9:37 p.m.:  Overtime, baby. Tennessee coming off an 83-77 OT win against Iowa, by the way.9:36 p.m.:  Tennessee curiously calls a timeout with .1 second left on the clock. Looks like this might be heading to overtime.9:35 p.m.:  Makes the third to tie it at 82 with 1.7 remaining.9:35 p.m.:  Makes the second.9:34 p.m.:  Misses the first.9:34 p.m.:  Carsen Edwards takes the inbound pass and is fouled on a 3-point attempt with 1.7 remaining.9:32 p.m.:  Carsen Edwards takes up the court and is blocked by Grant Williams. Replay upcoming to see who was the last to touch the ball. There’s 2.5 left on the clock.9:30 p.m.:  Grant Williams gets a put-back dunk to make it 82-80 with 8.8 seconds left. This game has been absurd, but there’s plenty of time left for an even crazier finish.GRANT. WILLIAMS. 😱VOLS UP 2!!! #MarchMadness | #Sweet16 pic.twitter.com/2KoJakYEix— NCAA March Madness (@marchmadness) March 29, 20199:28 p.m.: Grant Williams makes a dunk with less than a minute left it make it 80-78. And, of course, Ryan Cline is there to answer with a 3. He is 6 of 9 from beyond the arc and has a game-leading 24 points (22 of which has come in the second half).  RYAN CLINE IS NOT HUMAN pic.twitter.com/bzemdSGLHJ— CBS Sports (@CBSSports) March 29, 20199:26 p.m.:  Admiral Schofield and Ryan Cline are trading 3s like their lives depend on it (and, in a way, they do).THAT’S A DEEP 3️⃣ FOR PURDUE! 🔥 #Sweet16 #MarchMadness | @BoilerBall pic.twitter.com/rkOiIc4Zmq— NCAA March Madness (@marchmadness) March 29, 20199:19 p.m.:  That Schofield 3: Did we mention Tennessee was at one point down 18 points to the Boilermakers?ADMIRAL SCHOFIELD FOR THE LEAD! 💦 #Sweet16 #MarchMadness | @Vol_Hoops pic.twitter.com/e6y2DWowjf— NCAA March Madness (@marchmadness) March 29, 20199:17 p.m.:  This game is getting wild. Admiral Schofield hit a shot clock-beating 3 to take the Vols’ second lead of the game, 70-67. Then Purdue’s Ryan Cline hit his fourth 3 to knot it up at 0. Fewer than five minutes left in this one.9:12 p.m.:  Looks like Tennessee’s on the other end of the comeback attempt now. The Vols are on an 11-0 run over the last 3:18. Purdue’s lead is now 65-62.TENNESSEE MAKES IT A 3-PT GAME! 😳The Vols are on a 11-0 run. #MarchMadness | @Vol_Hoops pic.twitter.com/tjqalMo0E8— NCAA March Madness (@marchmadness) March 29, 20199:08 p.m.: A timely 3-pointer by Admiral Schofield cuts Purdue’s lead to 65-56. That’s part of a 5-0 run by the Vols with fewer than 10 minutes remaining.8:58 p.m.:  Tennessee getting a little 11-3 run going, cutting the lead to single digits (56-57) with 13:19 remaining.8:53 p.m.:  This kind of shooting from long range certainly isn’t hindering Purdue, either.The Boilermakers are HOT in Louisville! 🔥 #Sweet16 #MarchMadness | @BoilerBall pic.twitter.com/zTLbIIAc10— NCAA March Madness (@marchmadness) March 29, 20198:48 p.m.:  Purdue’s not letting up, going on a 11-5 scoring run in the last 2:10 (free throw pending).8:46 p.m.:  Purdue absolutely dominating in the paint right now. Outscoring the Vols 18-8.8:40 p.m.:  And we’re back. Purdue opens with a missed 3, and Tennessee rebounds. Early timeout taken by the Vols.8:17 p.m.:  And that’ll do it for the half. Purdue leads 40-28, and Tennessee should be thankful it’s not bigger. Carsen Edwards has been fantastic, putting up a game-high 15 points on 5-of-11 shooting, including 4 of 8 from beyond the arc. Jordan Bowden leads Tennessee with 10 points.Halftime stats for #Purdue -Tennessee: pic.twitter.com/tXaMYtNmgD— Nathan Baird (@nbairdjc) March 29, 20198:14 p.m.:  Admiral Schofield, who is 0 for 4 from the field and 0 for 2 from the free throw line, is heading to the charity stripe with Tennessee down 40-28.8:07 p.m.:  Carsen Edwards is 3 of 6 on 3-pointers after missing his first two attempts. Purdue leads 35-24.8:04 p.m.:  What an incredible sequence.#Sweet16 is all about HUSTLE! 💨 #MarchMadness | @BoilerBall pic.twitter.com/ktJDkXKlct— NCAA March Madness (@marchmadness) March 29, 20197:54 p.m.:  Tough sledding for Tennessee early.Make THAT a 10-0 run for Purdue! 😳 #Sweet16 #MarchMadness | @BoilerBall pic.twitter.com/UNbaOjmIbk— NCAA March Madness (@marchmadness) March 28, 20197:50 p.m.: One good block deserves another … this one from Carsen Edwards.Boilermakers block ➡️ Carsen Edwards 👌! #Sweet16 #MarchMadness | @BoilerBall pic.twitter.com/FI94v7xwGM— NCAA March Madness (@marchmadness) March 28, 20197:49 p.m.:  Purdue has gone on an 8-0 run to take a 21-13 lead. 7:47 p.m.:  Kinda hard to play without two shoes … Purdue leads 18-13 with 11:56 left in the half.Shoe down! pic.twitter.com/y6rdTBSWgY— CBS Sports (@CBSSports) March 28, 20197:41 p.m.:  And now we’re knotted up at 13 thanks to a 6-0 run by Tennessee (courtesy of a pair of 3s by Jordan Bowden). Thursday’s Sweet 16 matchup between 2-seed Tennessee and 3-seed Purdue was a thriller.Tennessee was at one point down 18 in the second half, but mounted a furious comeback that saw several lead changes leading into the final minutes. Purdue’s Carsen Edwards and Ryan Cline were magnificent down the stretch, as were Tennessee’s Grant Williams and Admiral Schofield, but there could only be one winner in this meeting (apart from everyone who got to watch it).  7:37 p.m.:  Purdue leads Tennessee 9-7 at the first timeout, but it could have had another bucket if not for this big-time denial.Grant Williams DENIES Carsen Edwards! 🚫 #Sweet16 #MarchMadness | @Vol_Hoops pic.twitter.com/T2gJ4kpbFc— NCAA March Madness (@marchmadness) March 28, 20197:33 p.m.:  And Purdue responds by hitting its next three shots to take a 6-3 lead. 7:30 p.m:  And Jordan Bone starts the scoring with a 3-pointer for Tennessee. Here we go.Jordan Bone with a 👌 right out the gate! #Sweet16 | #MarchMadness pic.twitter.com/nx3zH1ARAd— NCAA March Madness (@marchmadness) March 28, 2019last_img read more