The pros and cons of turning professional

first_imgThough the stars of athletics make nowhere near the money gained by their peers in football, boxing, golf, Formula One and the domestic American sports, it’s becoming more tempting for young prospects to make the big move. They’d best beware. It’s not for everyone. Young American high-school sprinters Kaylin Whitney and Candace Hill have recently parlayed their promise into the pros at age 16. Here at home, Jaheel Hyde and Michael O’Hara are both foregoing their last year of high school eligibility to take the pro road. From all reports, both Hyde and O’Hara have tertiary studies built into their plans. That’s smart because there’s no absolute guarantee of a lucrative career in the professional ranks. Injury or loss of form can turn things upside down. Ristananna Tracey left Edwin Allen High School as the second fastest junior 400-metre hurdler of all-time. Sadly, through a combination of circumstances, she has not made progress. Hopefully, her change of training camps to G.C. Foster College will bear fruit, for one whose potential for greatness is still undeniable. IGNORE EDUCATION In a world where proven champions like Norwegian javelin great Andreas Thorkildsen can lose their sponsorship if they lag behind top form, young prospects take a risk when they ignore education. On the other side of the coin is Danielle Williams. She left The Queen’s School as a fine prospect, but not a star. She took the traditional route to college in US scholarship and now she is World Champion. The recent ISSA ruling barring professionals from Boys and Girls Championships forces high school student athletes and their families to decide. Missing Champs is one thing, but missing college is another even more critical decision. If things don’t work out athletically, then the unsuccessful young professional could find himself or herself out on a limb without no income from the sport and no college qualification at 24 or 25. Luckily, today’s world has options. If they prefer, they can stay in Jamaica, where a growing number of tertiary institutions are offering scholarships to student athletes. They can do what Herb McKenley did 1942 and take a US sport scholarship. As Omar McLeod has done recently at the University of Arkansas, student athletes can turn pro early with their sponsors obliged to pay for the remainder of their college tuition. Both routes have produced success, academically and athletically. To be fair, some sportsmen can take the risk to forego college. Usain Bolt and Lebron James are examples of super successful athletes who went pro early and skipped college. However, since no one can be absolutely sure of their athletic future, the best option is to keep academics in the picture.last_img read more

Zanzibar diminish Rwanda semis hopes

first_imgYahya opened the scoring for the Zanzibaris who were playing their first match of the tournament, heading into the net a cross from Abdallah Salum Kheri in the 33rd minute with keeper Yves Kimenyi well beaten.Before the goal, it was a balanced affair with each team going up in attack. Rwanda had come close in the 25th minute when Innocent Nhsuti connected Hakizimana’s freekick at the edge of the box but it hit the upright, though the ref whistled for offside.Three minutes before his goal, Yahya had tried his luck from distance after wriggling past his marker and finding shooting space but the effort was way over.A minute to the break, Hakizimana who was trusted with set pieces had one from a decent scoring range, but he sent it straight to the keeper.Hey made changes right at the start of the second half, Mico Justine and Birahimire Abeddy coming in for Sekamana Maxime and Mbogo Ali.Rwanda’s Abeddy Birahimire (R) attempts to go past Zanzibar’s Ibrahim Mohammed Said during their CECAFA Senior Challenge Cup match at the Kenyatta Stadium in Machakos on December 5, 2017. PHOTO/Timothy OlobuluThe changes worked magic just a minute into the second stanza when Abeddy exchanged passes with Muhadjiri inside the box, the latter finding space unmarked at the far post to easily tap in.Abeddy had a close chance to make it 2-1 for the Rwandese when he raced in to a Fitina Omborenga cross from the right, but he glanced his header over unmarked inside the box.The Rwandese were made to pay for the missed chance in the 52nd minute when a lapse in defense saw Feisal Salum win the ball inside the box before cutting back to Juma who curled it past the keeper.Five minutes later, it was almost another equalizer for Rwanda when Omborenga had a great chance unmarked at the far post from Abeddy’s pass, but his shot was saved by the Zanzibar keeper.From a text book counter attack, the islanders put the game to rest with three minutes left, Khamis beating the keeper one on one after picking the ball on the right.0Shares0000(Visited 3 times, 1 visits today) 0Shares0000Zanzibar’s Abdul Aziz Makame (R) joins Kasim Suleiman Khamis (L) in celebrating his goal against Rwanda during their CECAFA Senior Challenge Cup match at the Kenyatta Stadium in Machakos on December 5, 2017. PHOTO/Raymond MakhayaMACHAKOS, Kenya, Dec 5- Antoine Hey paid the ultimate price for changing his entire squad as Rwanda lost their second consecutive CECAFA Senior Challenge match going down 3-1 to Zanzibar at the Kenyatta Stadium in Machakos on Tuesday afternoon.Muhadjiri Hakizimana’s goal two minutes after the restart had cancelled out Mudathir Yahya’s first half goal for Zanzibar, but a defensive lapse saw Issa Juma score the second six minutes later while Khamis Suleiman struck the winner with four minutes left.last_img read more