The pros and cons of turning professional

first_imgThough the stars of athletics make nowhere near the money gained by their peers in football, boxing, golf, Formula One and the domestic American sports, it’s becoming more tempting for young prospects to make the big move. They’d best beware. It’s not for everyone. Young American high-school sprinters Kaylin Whitney and Candace Hill have recently parlayed their promise into the pros at age 16. Here at home, Jaheel Hyde and Michael O’Hara are both foregoing their last year of high school eligibility to take the pro road. From all reports, both Hyde and O’Hara have tertiary studies built into their plans. That’s smart because there’s no absolute guarantee of a lucrative career in the professional ranks. Injury or loss of form can turn things upside down. Ristananna Tracey left Edwin Allen High School as the second fastest junior 400-metre hurdler of all-time. Sadly, through a combination of circumstances, she has not made progress. Hopefully, her change of training camps to G.C. Foster College will bear fruit, for one whose potential for greatness is still undeniable. IGNORE EDUCATION In a world where proven champions like Norwegian javelin great Andreas Thorkildsen can lose their sponsorship if they lag behind top form, young prospects take a risk when they ignore education. On the other side of the coin is Danielle Williams. She left The Queen’s School as a fine prospect, but not a star. She took the traditional route to college in US scholarship and now she is World Champion. The recent ISSA ruling barring professionals from Boys and Girls Championships forces high school student athletes and their families to decide. Missing Champs is one thing, but missing college is another even more critical decision. If things don’t work out athletically, then the unsuccessful young professional could find himself or herself out on a limb without no income from the sport and no college qualification at 24 or 25. Luckily, today’s world has options. If they prefer, they can stay in Jamaica, where a growing number of tertiary institutions are offering scholarships to student athletes. They can do what Herb McKenley did 1942 and take a US sport scholarship. As Omar McLeod has done recently at the University of Arkansas, student athletes can turn pro early with their sponsors obliged to pay for the remainder of their college tuition. Both routes have produced success, academically and athletically. To be fair, some sportsmen can take the risk to forego college. Usain Bolt and Lebron James are examples of super successful athletes who went pro early and skipped college. However, since no one can be absolutely sure of their athletic future, the best option is to keep academics in the picture.last_img read more

Craftsman Style Homes Cost a Premium

first_img Amenities Craftsman Style Farmhouse Home Home Shoppers Homebuyers HOUSING markets Offers Zillow 2018-05-02 Radhika Ojha Craftsman Style Homes Cost a Premium in Daily Dose, Data, Featured, News Many dreamy-eyed millennials are entering the housing market with their sights set on farmhouse and craftsman style homes, but they may have to pay a price for their sense of style. Entry-level homes described as “craftsman” or mentioning farmhouse style characteristics come at a premium, according to a study released Wednesday by RealEstate.com. RealEstate.com, a Zillow Group brand focused on assisting first-time homebuyers, analyzed millions of descriptions of entry-level homes to determine which features cost homebuyers the most. Homes priced in the bottom third of the market are considered “entry-level.” Making up 42 percent of homebuyers and 71 percent of first-time buyers, millennials are beginning to have “an increasingly notable impact on the market,” according to RealEstate.com. In the entry-level sector, “craftsman” homes sold for 34 percent more than other comparable homes without the “craftsman” designation between 2016 and 2017. Starter homes with “coffered ceilings” or “clawfoot tubs” came at a 29 percent premium, according to the analysis. Other high-value features or descriptors included “mid-century,” “in-law,” “landscape/path/outdoor/deck lighting,” “exposed beam or ceiling,” “farmhouse sink,” and “wainscot.” All of these features came at a premium between 25 and 30 percent in the entry-level sector of the market. Buyers in the top tier of the housing market also paid more for these features, but the premiums were lower on a percentage basis. “Craftsman” and “coffered ceilings” bumped prices for high-end homes up by 20 percent. Homebuyers in the top tier prioritized “outdoor kitchens,” which came at a 28 percent premium, and “heated floor; radiant heat,” which cost buyers 25 percent more. While style was clearly a priority among homebuyers shopping for lower-priced homes, energy efficiency may be the most coveted feature. In the low-priced home sector, solar panels came at the ultimate premium, selling for 40 percent more than homes without. Homebuyers in the top tier paid just 13 percent more for solar panels. “In today’s competitive housing market, understanding what homes may command a premium or attract multiple offers can be hugely beneficial to buyers,” said Jeremy Wacksman, Chief Marketing Officer at Zillow Group. With nearly a quarter of homes selling for more than their asking price in 2017, according to research from Zillow, Wacksman urges home shoppers to “keep in mind which features or amenities matter most to you in a home.”“While a farmhouse sink or butcher block counters may appeal to many millennials and first-time buyers, not everyone may want to pay the premium those features may command,” he continued.center_img May 2, 2018 612 Views Sharelast_img read more