Whistler Film Festival 2016 Before the Streets nabs best Canadian film prize

first_img Facebook Login/Register With: The Whistler Film Festival said goodbye for another year with its usual round of awards on Sunday (December 4).Thanks to a jury composed of filmmaker Deepa Mehta, actor Tzi Ma (recently seen in Arrival), and actor-writer-director (and more) Ingrid Veninger, the Borsos Award for Best Canadian Feature went to Before the Streets. Chloé Leriche also took the Best Borsos Director honours for her feature debut, the tale of violence and spiritual redemption set in Quebec’s Manawan Reserve and featuring Atikamekw nonactors (one of whom, Rykko Bellemare, received an honourable mention in the Best Performance category.) BEFORE THE STREETS Advertisement Advertisementcenter_img LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Advertisement Here’s the full list of winners, but don’t forget to check out Amanda Siebert’s review of Before the Streets, here.Before the Streets, Borsos Award for Best Canadian FeatureChloé Leriche Best Borsos Director, Before the StreetsKawennahere Devery Jacobs Best Performance in a Borsos Film, The Sun at Midnight. (Honourable Mention for Performance to Rykko Bellemare in Before the Streets)The Cyclotron, Borsos Award for Best ScreenplayThe Cyclotron, Best Cinematography in a Borsos FilmSled Dogs and The Will to Fly tied for World Documentary Award (Honourable Mention for World Documentary to Mr. Zartisky on TV)The Will to Fly, Best Mountain Culture Film“Mutants”, Canadian ShortWork Award“Timecode”, International ShortWork AwardThe Head Vanishes, Best Canadian Screenplay Award“Bombing”, ShortWork Student Award goes to BOMBING“Good Girls Don’t”, MPPIA Short Film AwardBefore the Streets, AWFJ EDA Best Female-Directed Narrative Feature AwardSled Dogs, AWFJ EDA Best Female-Directed Documentary AwardBY Adrian Mack – THE GEORGIA STRAIGHT Twitterlast_img read more

G Grant Machum appointed ViceChair of Telefilm Canadas Board

first_img Twitter Advertisement LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment MONTREAL, March 22, 2017 – Telefilm Canada is pleased to announce that G. Grant Machum, Chair of the Nominating, Evaluation and Governance Committee, has been named Vice-Chair of its Board. Mr. Machum replaces Elise Orenstein, whose mandate ended in December 2016.“We are delighted with this nomination,” said Michel Roy, Telefilm Canada’s Chair. “Over the last nine years, Grant Machum has been an invaluable member of the Board, providing steady stewardship and ensuring the sound governance of both the Board and the organization.”G. Grant Machum added: “I couldn’t be more honoured. This year, Telefilm Canada celebrates its 50th anniversary, and over these last five decades, the Canadian audiovisual industry has matured into a vital sector of activity at home and abroad. I am proud of the work we do to grow and support this industry, both today and in the future.” Hailing from Halifax, Mr. Machum is a partner of Stewart McKelvey, a leading Atlantic Canada law firm. He has served in various leadership roles, including head of the Labour and Employment Group. He is a member of the Nova Scotia Barristers Society, the Law Society of New Brunswick and the Law Society of Upper Canada. He represents clients from across Canada and has expertise in board governance.A graduate of Dalhousie University (Bachelor of Commerce) and the University of New Brunswick (LL.B.), Mr. Machum has served on numerous boards and is past Chair and Board member of Nova Scotia College of Art and Design University where he also served as Chair of Governance and Chair of the Presidential Search Committee. Other current board appointments include Prescott Group, Symphony Nova Scotia and the Advisory Committee for Grafton Connor Group.About Telefilm Canada – Inspired by talent. Viewed everywhere.Celebrating 50 years in 2017, Telefilm is dedicated to the cultural, commercial and industrial success of Canada’s audiovisual industry. Through funding and promotion programs, Telefilm supports dynamic companies and creative talent at home and around the world. Telefilm also makes recommendations regarding the certification of audiovisual treaty coproductions to the Minister of Canadian Heritage, and administers the programs of the Canada Media Fund. Launched in 2013, the Talent Fund accepts private donations to principally support emerging talent. Visit telefilm.ca and follow us on Twitter at twitter.com/telefilm_canada and on Facebook at facebook.com/telefilmcanada. Facebook Advertisement Advertisement Login/Register With:last_img read more

Lucy Maud Montgomery — and PEI — to be featured in Heritage

first_img Facebook Twitter Lucy Maud Montgomery will finally be making her debut on Heritage Minutes.The series of sixty-second short films illustrate an important moment in Canadian history.P.E.I. has been featured twice: the memorable Rural Teacher and the story of the Charlottetown Conference with Sir John A. Macdonald. Login/Register With: Advertisement Shooting of the 60-second Heritage Minute is taking place this week on P.E.I., including Thunder Cove. (Tom Steepe/CBC)center_img LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Davida Aronovitch, the manager of Heritage Minutes, says Montgomery’s Minute will show a personal side of the Anne of Green Gables author.“I think a lot of Canadians know that L.M. Montgomery wrote Anne of Green Gables, and that she shaped Anne after her own dreams and experiences, but I think fewer know who she really was a person, and she’s fascinating, so we’re hoping to share something of that with Canadians.”There have been many requests over the years for a Lucy Maud Montgomery Heritage Minute, according to Historica Canada, the company responsible for the short films. (Parks Canada)A crew is on the Island this week, shooting in some of Montgomery’s favourite places.Montgomery was inspired by the natural landscape and it wasn’t uncommon for her to get out into nature for long walks, to take trips to the beach, sometimes even to write at the beach, Aronovitch said.READ MORE Advertisement Advertisementlast_img read more

Inside the kitchen of The Bachelor Canada and Carnival Eats host Noah

first_img Facebook Login/Register With: Between filming Carnival Eats and The Bachelor Canada, TV host Noah Cappe spent over 200 days on the road last year. This means, when he’s home in Toronto, Cappe spends most of his time relaxing with his wife, Keri West, and his friends and family—not cooking. “We’ve used our oven five times at the most since we moved in—two years ago,” says West. The couple, though, are known for their epic parties. (Cappe has seven siblings, so even intimate family gatherings are pretty big affairs.) They’re about to begin a massive reno on the first floor of their 100-year-old Christie Pits home. They’re adding a sunken living room to the back of the house, with a private theatre underneath. “The kitchen will be at the centre of everything, the heartbeat of the house,” says Cappe.Since neither Cappe nor West are big on cooking, their grocery list is curt: bread (bagels, English muffins, baguettes, toast) and Harmony milk. “Bread is my weakness,” says Cappe. “And chocolate milk, my medicine.” When pressed about what she likes to make for herself at home, West asks, “Does that include UberEats?”READ MORE Advertisement Advertisementcenter_img LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment NOAH CAPPE – PHOTOGRAPHY BY GABBY FRANK Twitterlast_img read more

CANADIAN COUNTRY SINGER GEORGE CANYON TO PLAY TEEN ANGEL IN GREASE THE

first_img Login/Register With: Advertisement George Canyon, a Juno Award-winning country singer from Nova Scotia, takes the role June 12 to 17; Big Time Rush star Logan Henderson is onstage June 24 to 29; and Drake Bell, star of Drake & Josh, is up July 3 to 8.This Toronto re-engagement stars Janel Parrish of Pretty Little Liars as Sandy and Matthew Helfer as Danny. See greaseonstage.com for more information.By DEBRA YEO | Toronto Star LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Advertisement A Canadian country music star and three TV notables are making cameo appearances in Grease: The Musical, now onstage at Toronto’s Winter Garden Theatre.Producers say guest cameos in the role of “Teen Angel” date back to former teen idol Frankie Avalon, who played the role in the 1978 movie and also onstage.First up in Toronto June 7 to 10 is Mark Ballas, an Emmy-nominated choreographer and Dancing With the Stars performer who made his Broadway debut as Frankie Valli in Jersey Boys.center_img Facebook Canadian country music star George Canyon is one of four celebrities who will make cameo appearances in Grease: The Musical in Toronto. Twitter Advertisementlast_img read more

FORMER CTV WINNIPEG SPORTSCASTER PLEADS GUILTY TO ROBBING 2 BANKS IN MEDICINE

first_img Twitter Vogelsang was arrested in October 2017 after a Royal Bank of Canada branch and a Bank of Montreal branch were robbed.Earlier this month he was sentenced to five years in prison after pleading guilty to a string of bank robberies in Regina and Saskatoon in 2017.With credit for time served he has three years left in his sentence.Vogelsang was a sports anchor and news director for many years with CKY (now CTV Winnipeg) and was also a journalism instructor at Red River College in Winnipeg.THE CANADIAN PRESS Login/Register With: A former journalist arrested almost two years ago after two banks were robbed in Medicine Hat, Alta., has been convicted of the crimes.Stephen Vogelsang, who is 55, entered guilty pleas Thursday in provincial court to two counts of robbery.He is to be sentenced on July 30. Advertisement Advertisementcenter_img Stephen Vogelsang was a journalism instructor at Red River College from 2002-11 and before that was the news director and longtime sports anchor at CTV. (Steve Vogelsang/Facebook) Facebook LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Advertisementlast_img read more

Samson Cree residents searching for answers after another deadly shooting

first_imgAPTN National NewsThe people of the Samson Cree First Nation in Alberta are once again in shock and in mourning.Another member of their community has been killed in a late-night shooting believed to be gang related.The victim is the aunt of a little boy who died after being shot in an unsolved drive-by two months ago.APTN National News reporter Keith Laboucan has the details.last_img

Jordans Principle – Equal Access

first_imgInFocus on APTN National News:Parliament’s unanimous adoption of Jordan’s Principle was supposed to mean children living on reserve would get the same access to health supports as all other children who live off reserve.But 7 years later families living in First Nation communities still have to fight for equality of services.What are the issues standing in the way?Is the government’s definition of who qualifies fair and reasonable?Representatives from neither Health Canada nor Aboriginal Affairs would go on-camera and answer our questions.But our guests sure have a lot to say!We put Trina Roache’s series, Outside the Circle: the Status of Jordan’s Principle, InFocus.last_img read more

Hes trying to make a buck off our backs Kanesatake grand chief suspends talks

first_imgLindsay RichardsonAPTN News Kanesatake Grand Chief Serge Simon came to the bargaining table with his council on Friday expecting an apology that, in the end, never came.As a result, Simon said he’s decided to cut off all talks with Oka Mayor Pascal Quevillon after the mayor refused to apologize for derogatory comments about the Mohawk territory.Simon and his band council met with federal and provincial governments earlier in the day in an attempt to diffuse tensions over a land dispute between Kanesatake and neighbouring Oka, northwest of Montreal.“The Mayor simply opened up this issue – and [Mohawk] council wasn’t prepared,” he told reporters. “It made it look like we refused or were hiding something, and we weren’t.“We have to take this back to the community somehow and start explaining, but what are we going to explain?” Simon added.The grand chief met with Marc Miller, parliamentary secretary to the federal minister of Crown-Indigenous relations and Quebec’s Indigenous Affairs Minister Sylvie D’Amours, at the downtown offices of Quebec Premier Francois Legault – who was not present for Friday’s trilateral encounter.As he left the discussions, Simon said he and his council had decided they “were not going to give the mayor any more importance.”“Yes the bridges are cut,” Simon told reporters alongside Ghislain Picard, regional chief of the Assembly of First Nations for Quebec and Labrador. “We’ll have no more discussions with him. My council agrees with me.“I think the population of this province should be looking at this mayor and really recognizing that he’s really not on the right track,” Simon added.Emotions have run high since news broke of local developer Gregoire Gollin’s intention to give back 60 hectares to the federal government as an ecological gift with the possibility that it would be eventually purchased by Kanesatake.Quevillon offended many on the territory when he raised concerns about becoming encircled by Kanesatake.Quevillon has said property values would decline and raised fears of illegal dumping and an expansion of cannabis and cigarette merchants.Oka’s mayor met with Miller and D’Amours following their discussions with the Mohawk leaders.On his way into the office tower, Quevillon told reporters he didn’t know what he was supposed to be apologizing for – and that he was unaware that the grand chief was expecting an apology prior to talks progressing.“What I understand is that I used words like smoke and pot shacks,” he said. “That’s the reality unfortunately. What we are seeing is the reality.”Quevillon said the Mohawks claim the land on which his town is settled, and his population feels as if they have been “taken hostage” by land disputes, including those in Deux-Montagnes, and a parcel of land in Mirabel – an ancestral hunting ground of the Mohawk people, according to Simon – that was also returned to the federal government earlier this year.“It’s 300 years that Oka is there, and we’re being told that, finally, these are lands that belong to the Mohawks,” he said.Simon said Quevillon’s comments Friday morning made things worse.“He made it clear he’s not going to apologize about what he conceives as the truth when he describes my community,” Simon said.“My community has several social problems, yes. But what’s he’s describing … it’s not the will of my council to propagate those social problems.”Despite the conflict with the Oka mayor, Simon said he had positive discussions with Miller and D’Amours.He said they talked with him about opening up more formal lines of communication between his council and the federal and provincial governments regarding land claims and expanding Kanesatake’s territory.For his part, Miller said he wasn’t expecting today’s meetings to result in a “historical breakthrough,” but rather to open the table to discussions while denouncing the use of inflammatory or sensationalist language moving forward.“It’s very important to have truthful information so that both communities can digest it and come to opinions as to what [the proposed agreement] is,” Miller explained. “The false information is very concerning for both federal and provincial governments.”“These exchanges of words, these dialogues – even in front of reporters – are done with the utmost respect, because we know we have learned from our lessons in the past,” he added.D’Amours said that she was satisfied with the outcome of the meetings with both the grand chief and Quevillion.“I’m very happy that we were able to have a day of frank dialogue with stakeholders,” D’Amours said.“I think we need to remember what the citizens want, and the citizens don’t want a crisis. So I think that both parties – even if both gentlemen don’t speak – the two parties agree that there has to be a dialogue, and there also has a be respect towards the population who don’t want a second crisis.”But, Simon said, any discussion about the expansion of Kanesatake is premature.His people will need to be consulted and vote on whether or not to accept any donations of land that the Mohawks already claim as theirs.“Our community still has to decide,” Simon said. “I think the mayor pressed the panic button a little too quickly.”With files from The Canadian Press.lrichardson@aptn.ca@sentimtllast_img read more

FCC votes along party lines to end net neutrality

first_imgThe Federal Communications Commission repealed the Obama-era “net neutrality” rules Thursday, giving internet service providers like Verizon, Comcast and AT&T a free hand to slow or block websites and apps as they see fit or charge more for faster speeds.In a straight party-line vote of 3-2, the Republican-controlled FCC junked the longtime principle that said all web traffic must be treated equally. The move represents a radical departure from more than a decade of federal oversight.The big telecommunications companies had lobbied hard to overturn the rules, contending they are heavy-handed and discourage investment in broadband networks.“What is the FCC doing today?” asked FCC chairman Ajit Pai, a Republican. “Quite simply, we are restoring the light-touch framework that has governed the internet for most of its existence.”The push to eliminate net neutrality has stirred fears among consumer advocates, Democrats, many web companies and ordinary Americans afraid that the cable and phone giants will be able to control what people see and do online. But the broadband industry has promised that the internet experience for the public isn’t going to change.The FCC vote is unlikely to be the last word. Net neutrality supporters threatened legal challenges, with New York’s attorney general vowing to lead a multistate lawsuit. Some Democrats want to overturn the FCC action in Congress.“The fact that Chairman Pai went through with this, a policy that is so unpopular, is somewhat shocking,” said Mark Stanley, a spokesman for the civil liberties organization Demand Progress. “Unfortunately, not surprising.”On Thursday, about 60 demonstrators gathered in the bitter chill of Washington to protest the FCC’s expected decision. Just before the vote, the hearing room was briefly evacuated and searched for unspecified security reasons.The FCC subscribed to the principle of net neutrality for over a decade and enshrined it in rules adopted in 2015.Under the new rules approved Thursday, the Comcasts and AT&Ts of the world could slow down or block access to services they don’t like or happen to be in competition with. They could also charge higher fees of rivals and make them pay up for higher transmission speeds. They just have to post their policies online or tell the FCC.Such things have happened before. In 2007, for example, The Associated Press found that Comcast was blocking or throttling some file-sharing. And AT&T blocked Skype and other internet calling services on the iPhone until 2009.Thursday’s rule change also eliminates certain federal consumer protections, bars state laws that contradict the FCC’s approach, and largely transfers oversight of internet service to another agency altogether, the Federal Trade Commission.Angelo Zino, an analyst at CFRA Research, said he expects AT&T and Verizon to be the biggest beneficiaries because the two internet giants can now give priority to the movies, TV shows and other videos or music they provide to viewers. That could hurt rivals such as Sling TV, Amazon, YouTube or startups yet to be born.However, AT&T senior executive vice-president Bob Quinn said in a blog post that the internet “will continue to work tomorrow just as it always has.” He said the company won’t block websites and won’t throttle or degrade online traffic based on content.Internet companies such as Google, Twitter and Facebook have strongly backed net neutrality.Netflix said in a tweet it is “disappointed in the decision to gut #NetNeutrality protections that ushered in an unprecedented era of innovation, creativity & civic engagement. This is the beginning of a longer legal battle.”White House spokeswoman Sarah Huckabee Sanders said the Trump administration “supports the FCC’s effort to roll back burdensome regulations. But as we have always done and will continue to do, we certainly support a free and fair Internet.”FCC Commissioner Mignon Clyburn, a Democrat appointed by President Barack Obama, lambasted the “preordained outcome” of the vote that she said hurts small and large businesses and ordinary people. She said the end of net neutrality hands over the keys to the internet to a “handful of multibillion-dollar corporations.”With their vote, she added, the FCC’s Republican commissioners are abandoning the pledge they took to make a rapid, efficient communications service available to all people in the U.S., without discrimination.But Michael O’Rielly, a GOP commissioner appointed by Obama, called the FCC’s approach a “well-reasoned and soundly justified order.”The internet, he said, “has functioned without net neutrality rules for far longer than it has with them.” The decision “will not break the internet.”New York Attorney General Eric Schneiderman, a Democrat, has been investigating what appear to be large numbers of fake public comments submitted to the FCC during the net neutrality comment period. He said 2 million comments were submitted under stolen identities, including those of children and dead people.___Associated Press Writer Chris Rugaber in Washington contributed to this story.last_img read more

BCE sells AlarmForces western home monitoring customers to Telus

first_imgTORONTO – BCE and Bell Canada formally closed their $182-million purchase of AlarmForce Industries on Friday, and immediately announced that the home monitoring company’s western operations and client base will be sold to Telus Corp.Vancouver-based Telus (TSX:T) will pay about $66.5 million for about 39,000 customer accounts in British Columbia, Alberta and Saskatchewan — nearly 40 per cent of the total AlarmForce customer base in Canada.That’s equivalent to what Bell paid, per subscriber, to acquire Toronto-based AlarmForce and its 100,000 customers.Bell said AlarmForce customers — who pay monthly service fees — won’t see an immediate change and that Bell will work with Telus to ensure a smooth transition for the AlarmForce subscribers in the three western provinces.“For the time being, I would say that it’s going to be status quo for quite some time,” Rizwan Jamal, president of Bell Residential and Small Business, said in an interview.But eventually, he said, AlarmForce’s existing customers in the Bell territory will benefit from its investments in new, innovative services as well as the ability to bundle home monitoring with other services, particularly internet.“There is a good synergy between internet and the connected home,” Jamal said.“We continue to invest in our internet network and we’re making big investments in fibre (optic networks). We think this goes hand-in-hand with the connected home of the future.”He said Bell has “taken a couple of cracks” at the home monitoring business in the past but the timing is better now.“We really believe that monitoring is going to be an anchor of the solutions that we’re going to offer in the connected home. We feel (AlarmForce) is going to accelerate our position in that market,” Jamal said.IDC Canada researcher Emily Taylor said communication service providers hope to generate revenue from the proliferation of internet-enabled devices for homes — such as home-assistant speakers introduced to Canada last year.“And I think that’s ultimately why communications service providers across Canada are obviously striving for more ownership and investment in these services,” Taylor said. “More devices (means) more revenue, really.”She added that the connected-home services will help telephone, cable and wireless companies to retain their subscribers and help differentiate themselves from their competitors.Rogers got into the home security business in Ontario years ago and the AlarmForce acquisition is seen as a way for Bell Canada — its competitor in many industry segments — to become a more significant player.Jamal said BCE (TSX:BCE) was willing to sell such a large chunk of the AlarmForce customer base to Telus — a key rival in wireless networks — because most of Bell’s landline residential customer base is east of Saskatchewan.Telus — which has the majority of its residential lines in Alberta and British Columbia — has been quicker to push its home security services than Shaw Communications (TSX:SJR.B), its biggest competitor in the home market.“Telus has piloted technology in this space for a few years as part of our expanding home solutions services beyond internet, TV, and home phone as more products and services are connected to our network,” the company said in an emailed statement.last_img read more

US government shuts down Dems GOP blame each other

first_imgWASHINGTON – The federal government shut down at the stroke of midnight Friday, halting all but the most essential operations and marring the one-year anniversary of President Donald Trump’s inauguration in a striking display of Washington dysfunction.Last-minute negotiations crumbled as Senate Democrats blocked a four-week stopgap extension in a late-night vote, causing the fourth government shutdown in a quarter century. Behind the scenes, however, leading Republicans and Democrats were trying to work out a compromise to avert a lengthy shutdown.Congress scheduled an unusual Saturday session to begin considering a three-week version of the short-term spending measure — and to broadcast that they were at work as the shutdown commences. It seemed likely each side would try forcing votes aimed at making the other party look culpable for shuttering federal agencies.Since the closure began at the start of a weekend, many of the immediate effects will be muted for most Americans. But any damage could build quickly if the closure is prolonged. And it comes with no shortage of embarrassment for the president and political risk for both parties, as they wager that voters will punish the other at the ballot box in November.Social Security and most other safety net programs are unaffected by the lapse in federal spending authority. Critical government functions will continue, with uniformed service members, health inspectors and law enforcement officers set to work without pay. But if no deal is brokered before Monday, hundreds of thousands of federal employees will be furloughed.After hours of closed-door meetings and phone calls, the Senate scheduled its late-night vote on a House-passed plan. It gained 50 votes to proceed to 49 against, but 60 were needed to break a Democratic filibuster. A handful of red-state Democrats crossed the aisle to support the measure, rather than take a politically risky vote. Four Republicans voted in opposition.In an unusual move, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell allowed the roll call to exceed two hours— instead of the usual 20 or so — and run past midnight, seemingly accommodating the numerous discussions among leaders and other lawmakers. Still as midnight passed and the calendar turned, there was no obvious off-ramp to the political stalemate.Even before the vote, Trump was pessimistic, tweeting that Democrats actually wanted the shutdown “to help diminish the success” of the tax bill he and fellow Republicans pushed through last month. White House press secretary Sarah Sanders later termed the Democrats “obstructionist losers.”Democrats balked on the measure in an effort to pressure on the White House to cut a deal to protect “dreamer” immigrants — who were brought to the country as children and are now here illegally — before their legal protection runs out in March.The president watched the results from the White House residence, dialing up allies and affirming his belief that Democrats would take the blame for the shutdown, said a person familiar with his conversations but not authorized to discuss them publicly.Predictably, both parties moved swiftly to blame one another. Democrats laid fault with Republicans, who control both chambers of Congress and the White House and have struggled with building internal consensus. Republicans declared Democrats responsible, after they declined to provide the votes needed to overcome a filibuster over their desire to force the passage of legislation to protect some 700,000 younger immigrants from deportation.Republicans branded the confrontation a “Schumer shutdown” and argued that Democrats were harming fellow Americans to protect “illegal immigrants.” Senate Democratic leader Chuck Schumer said a “Trump shutdown” was more accurate.Earlier Friday, Trump had brought Schumer to the White House in hopes of cutting a deal on a short-term spending agreement.The two New Yorkers, who pride themselves on their negotiating abilities, started talking over cheeseburgers about a larger agreement that would have included greater military spending and money for a southern border wall.But the talks fell apart almost as abruptly as they started. In a phone call hours later, the president raised new concerns about the deal he and Schumer had discussed, according to a person familiar with the conversation. In a subsequent phone call with Schumer, chief of staff John Kelly said the deal discussed was too liberal. The White House did not immediately comment on that account.Budget Director Mick Mulvaney told CNN that “Not much has changed” over the course of the day, but he predicted a deal would be reached by Monday, when most government offices are to reopen after the weekend.Democrats in the Senate had served notice they would filibuster the government-wide funding bill that cleared the House Thursday evening. They were seeking an even shorter extension that they think would keep the pressure on the White House to cut a deal to protect the “dreamer” immigrants.“We will not negotiate the status of unlawful immigrants while Democrats hold our lawful citizens hostage over their reckless demands,” Sanders said in a statement.Trump first described his discussion with Schumer as an “excellent preliminary meeting,” tweeting that lawmakers were “making progress – four week extension would be best!” But that optimism faded as the evening wore on. McConnell did not attend the meeting because he was not invited, a Senate GOP aide said.Trump had been an unreliable negotiator in the weeks leading up to the showdown. Earlier this week he tweeted opposition to the four-week plan, forcing the White House to later affirm his support. He expressed openness to extending the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, only to reject a bipartisan proposal. His disparaging remarks about African and Haitian immigrants last week helped derail further negotiations.Trump had been set to leave Friday afternoon to attend a fundraiser at his Palm Beach, Florida, estate marking the one-year anniversary of his inauguration but delayed his travel.As word of the Schumer meeting spread, the White House hastened to reassure Republican congressional leaders that Trump would not make any major policy concessions, said a person familiar with the conversations but not authorized to be quoted by name.On Capitol Hill, McConnell said Americans at home would be watching to see “which senators make the patriotic decision” and which “vote to shove aside veterans, military families and vulnerable children to hold the entire country hostage… until we pass an immigration bill.”“We can’t keep kicking the can down the road,” said Schumer, insisting on more urgency in talks on immigration. “In another month, we’ll be right back here, at this moment, with the same web of problems at our feet, in no better position to solve them.”The four-week measure would have been the fourth stopgap spending bill since the current budget year started in October. A pile of unfinished Capitol Hill business has been on hold, first as Republicans ironed out last fall’s tax bill and now as Democrats insist on progress on immigration. Talks on a budget deal to ease tight spending limits on both the Pentagon and domestic agencies are on hold, as is progress on a huge $80 billion-plus disaster aid bill.Before Thursday night’s House approval, GOP leaders sweetened the stopgap measure with legislation to extend for six years a popular health care program for children from low-income families and two-year delays in unpopular “Obamacare” taxes on medical devices and generous employer-provided health plans.A shutdown would be the first since 2013, when tea party Republicans — in a strategy not unlike the one Schumer is employing now — sought to use a must-pass funding bill to try to force then-President Barack Obama to delay implementation of his marquee health care law. At the time, Trump told Fox & Friends that the ultimate blame for a shutdown lies at the top. “I really think the pressure is on the president,” he said.Arguing that Trump’s predecessors “weaponized” that shutdown, Mulvaney said Friday the budget office would direct agencies to work to mitigate the impact this time. That position is a striking role-reversal for the conservative former congressman, who was one of the architects of the 2013 shutdown over the Affordable Care Act.___Associated Press writers Jill Colvin and Catherine Lucey contributed to this report from Washington. AP writer Jonathan Lemire contributed from New York.last_img read more

North American markets fall into the red loonie down half a cent

first_imgTORONTO – The loonie lost more than half a cent on Tuesday as Canada’s main stock index fell and U.S. stocks ended a six-day winning streak following a long holiday weekend.The Canadian dollar closed at an average trading value of 79.23 cents US, down 0.51 of a cent US from Friday.“The dollar is at levels not seen at a while. We’re closing in on 79 cents,” said Luc de la Durantaye, managing director of CIBC Management.De la Durantaye said a decline in gold prices — the April bullion contract fell US$25.00 to US$1,331.20 an ounce on Tuesday — helped give the greenbank a leg up on several global currencies.“Gold had rallied along with the decline of the U.S. dollar. There’s always been a bit of a negative correlation between gold prices and the U.S. dollar,” he said.In currency markets, Toronto Stock Exchange’s S&P/TSX composite index was down 13.20 points to 15,439.44, weighed by losses in the gold, base metals and materials sectors.South of the border, a sell-off Tuesday afternoon led by technology companies wiped out early gains in New York.In New York, the Dow Jones industrial average fell 254.63 points to 24,964.75. The S&P 500 index was down 15.96 points to 2,716.26 and the Nasdaq composite index gave back 5.16 points to 7,234.31.Market commentators say some of the broader issues on investors’ minds right now are looking across to the bond market and seeing the U.S. 10-year Treasury starting to approach the 3 per cent level. Bond yields, which move opposite price, are rising on concerns of higher inflation.Worries about inflation sent stocks falling on Feb. 2 after reports of greater U.S. wage growth increased the likelihood that the Federal Reserve could raise interest rates more rapidly, making it more expensive for businesses and individuals to borrow money.Elsewhere in commodities on Tuesday, the April crude contract was up 24 cents to US$61.79 per barrel and the March natural gas contract was up six cents at US$2.62 per mmBTU.The March copper contract was down six cents to US$3.19 a pound.last_img read more

US fast food brand ChickfilA announces plans for Canadian expansion

first_imgTORONTO – A controversial fast food company that is known as much for its role in U.S. politics as it is for its chicken announced Wednesday that it will expand its Canadian presence over the next five years.Chick-fil-A Inc., which currently has a single Canadian location at Calgary International Airport, said it will open a restaurant in Toronto next year and has plans to establish about 15 locations around the Greater Toronto Area over the next five years.The Atlanta-based company’s expansion comes as a handful of foreign fast food chains are proving that they’re no chickens when it comes to Canada. In recent years, Filipino brand Jollibee and American chains Five Guys Burger and Fries, the Halal Guys, Wahlburgers and Blaze Pizza have entered the already-crowded Canadian market.Foreign brands are likely attracted to the country and Toronto because of the large population, international reputation and close proximity to the U.S., said food industry expert Robert Carter, who expects other large companies will watch Chick-fil-A’s expansion to guide whether they should head to Canada too.“Toronto is considered one of the more multicultural cities in North America, if not the world, so it is a great platform for brands expanding international to test out the Canadian market and then start to fine-tune some of the differences from the U.S. business model,” said Carter.“Chick-fil-A is a very beloved brand down in the U.S. with strong consumer loyalty and I think some of that brands’s awareness will translate for Canadians as well… When you look at loyalty, it is almost on par with a brand like Tim Hortons in Canada.”However, Chick-fil-A is unlike most of the homegrown fast-food brands or foreign ones that have come to Canada because it’s known for its religious and conservative values.The company is owned by the Cathy family, a billionaire evangelical Southern Baptist clan, which attracted plenty of attention in 2012, when its president Dan Cathy said he believes in the “the biblical definition of the family unit” and said those who “have the audacity to define what marriage is about” were “inviting God’s judgment on our nation”.When the Supreme Court chose to support same-sex marriages in the U.S. a year later, Cathy posted on Twitter that the “founding fathers would be ashamed of our generation” and pronounced it a “sad day for our nation.”His remarks caused politicians to call for the chain to boycotted, but Carter suspects the furor will be a “non-issue” for Canadians because he said once issues like these “fall out of the consciousness of consumers, it is business as usual.”He thinks Canadians will find it “curious” if the company sticks to its U.S. policy of keeping its locations closed on Sundays as a way of giving staff time off, but he doesn’t believe it will bother customers too much because he said there are many smaller restaurants that also don’t open that day of the week.To resonate with Canadian audiences, Carter mused that Chick-fil-A could make some changes to its menu items, perhaps rolling out a coffee program or more breakfast offerings, which have proved to be a boon for McDonald’s and Tim Hortons in Canada.Breakfast is the fastest-growing part of the day for restaurants since 2012, according to research companies NPD Group and Nielsen, and breakfast sandwiches make up a third of all orders placed during that time of day.Chick-fil-A will only boost the competition for morning meal dollars in Canada, Carter said, because the company offers a chicken breakfast sandwich, which he hasn’t seen other restaurants in the country roll out.He also considers Chick-fil-A’s expansion to come at an advantageous time because he has seen chicken recently become a “hot” and “go-to” menu item for Canadians.Chick-fil-A offers chicken nuggets, wraps and strips at its 2,300 restaurants in the U.S., which collectively brought the company more than $9 billion in revenue in 2017.Note to readers: This is a corrected story. An earlier version claimed that Chick-fil-A would open its first Canadian restaurant in Toronto in 2019.last_img read more

BC premier says wildfires prompted unprecedented second state of emergency

first_imgVANCOUVER – Premier John Horgan says successive B.C. governments have budgeted “laughable” amounts of money to fight wildfires that are becoming all too common through the ravages of climate change.Horgan said Tuesday during a visit to Prince George that the sky in the northern city turned jet black one morning last week from fires burning in nearby communities.“We have serious challenges for public health and we need to adapt our policy making, working with all levels of government to make sure that as we go forward we’re better prepared,” said Horgan, flanked by federal Defence Minister Harjit Sajjan, Mayor Lyn Hall and Grand Chief Ed John of the First Nations Summit.“Clearly, we are going to overshoot the budget again this year, which has happened repeatedly,” Horgan said, adding both federal and provincial governments must ensure adequate resources are available to safeguard communities.He said wildfires prompted an unprecedented second state of emergency in the province in the last 12 months after floods this spring, but he’s confident there’s enough contingency in the budget to provide the needed support.Canadian Armed Forces troops have been deployed to B.C. during the floods and wildfires this year, as well as for fires in 2017.Sajjan said troops have increasingly responded to disasters across Canada as climate change takes a toll on the environment.“We as a government do realize that we need to take steps in terms of how do we mitigate some of these things as we work very closely in trying to reduce our greenhouse gas emissions, do our part as the rest of the world needs to do theirs.”British Columbia budgeted $63 million for wildfire suppression for the 2018-19 season but has already spent $274 million, according to figures from the Forests Ministry. It said last year’s budget allocated the same amount of money, but the firefighting efforts cost $649 million.More than 2,000 evacuees headed to Prince George after being ordered out because of an 850-square-kilometre blaze threatening an area from Fraser Lake to Fort St. James.Smoke from distant wildfires is forcing residents in parts of the province to stay indoors, especially if they have pre-existing conditions such as asthma, and tourism is being affected where skies are hazy.Teck Resources temporarily shut down its lead smelting operations in Trail, saying a supplier plant that provides oxygen is closed due to poor air quality that is affecting lead smelting.As part of the city’s wildfire prevention program that started in 2005, Hall said the community will discuss what steps it can take to mitigate future wildfires, including clearing the forest floor of debris.Lori Daniels, an ecology professor at the University of British Columbia’s faculty of forestry, said only about one third of B.C. communities have wildfire prevention plans though the risk of such disasters is increasing.She said it’s time for the public to support initiatives including tree removal in forests close to homes as climate change creates hotter, drier conditions after decades of fire suppression policies that led to an accumulation of dead trees and twigs that act as fuel for fires that can quickly get out of control.“This is an issue for all of us who live near burnable vegetation, which is pretty much a large proportion of Canadians, even in urban areas where we have forests that could catch on fire with these extreme weather conditions,” Daniels said.Community wildfire prevention plans would assess hazards, including small and big trees that need to be cut down in areas where homes are built close to forested areas, she said.“In many places in B.C., the forests adjacent to communities are so dense that even when you drop water on them from a water bomber the water all stays at the top of the trees and never makes it to the ground where the fire is travelling.”Logan Lake fire Chief Daniel Leighton said the community began a wildfire prevention program with provincial grants after extensive fires in the province in 2003 during a record-dry summer.He said the current program involves youth employed through a summer job-creation initiative that has them trimming branches and picking up debris to rid the forest floor of fuel.Between 150 to 180 hectares have been treated by hand since 2003 though small amounts of land are also clearcut, he said, adding that part of the program was a “hard sell” for people opposed to logging that’s done through a corporation set up to put money back into the community.“Once you start cutting down trees and thinning them down some people don’t like it, although they don’t like the fires either. But the last few years have been an awakening for some people.”He said public meetings provided residents with information about the benefits of the program that has attracted attention from other jurisdictions wanting to follow suit, including Colorado, Ontario and elsewhere in B.C., where similar but much smaller programs exist in a few areas including Kamloops, Merritt and some ski resorts.— Follow @CamilleBains1 on Twitter.last_img read more

Most actively traded companies on the TSX

first_imgSome of the most active companies traded Friday on the Toronto Stock Exchange:Toronto Stock Exchange (16,355.54, down 88.85 points).Aurora Cannabis Inc. (TSX:ACB). Healthcare. Down 71 cents, or 7.68 per cent, to $8.54 on 28.4 million shares.Aphria Inc. (TSX:APH). Healthcare. Down 42 cents, or 2.81 per cent, to $14.55 on 19.3 million shares.Canopy Growth Corp. (TSX:WEED). Healthcare. Down $4.10, or 6.83 per cent, to $55.90 on 12.9 million shares.Nemaska Lithium Inc. (TSX:NMX). Mining. Up three cents, or 3.8 per cent, to 82 cents on 7.8 million shares.Bombardier Inc. (TSX:BBD.B) Industrials. Down nine cents, or two per cent, to $4.41 on 6 million shares.Cronos Group Inc. (TSX:CRON). Healthcare. Down $1.26, or 8.05 per cent, to $14.39 on 5.2 million shares.Companies reporting major news:Thomson Reuters Corp. (TSX:TRI). Up $1.71 or 3.05 per cent, to $57.74 on 1.56 million shares. The company announced it is offering to buy back up to US$9 billion of its outstanding common shares, representing about 31 per cent of its issued and outstanding shares. The shares will be purchased through a “modified Dutch auction” that will see shareholders who wish to sell tender their shares. The company says it will pay between US$42 and US$47 per share, which is between 0.4 and 11.5 per cent higher than the company’s volume weighted average price on the New York Stock Exchange over the past 20 trading days. The offer begins today and is expected to be completed on Oct. 2.Bank of Montreal (TSX:BMO). Up 19 cents, or 0.2 per cent, to $106.35 on 1.4 million shares. BMO Financial Group says the strength of its U.S. operations allowed the bank to beat expectations in earning $1.54 billion in the third quarter, up from $1.39 billion a year ago. On an adjusted basis, it earned $1.57 billion or $2.36 per share, compared with $1.37 billion or $2.03 per share a year ago. Analysts had expected the bank to earned $2.26 per share for the quarter, according to Thomson Reuters Eikon.Bank of Nova Scotia (TSX:BNS). Down $1.41, or 1.8 per cent to $76.89 on 3.7 million shares. The bank raised its dividend despite reporting lower profits in the third quarter, partially due to acquisition-related costs. Scotiabank net earnings slipped to $1.94 billion from $2.1 billion a year ago. Excluding one-time costs, adjusted earnings were $2.26 billion or $1.76 per diluted share in the quarter, up from $2.12 billion or $1.68 per diluted share a year ago. Analysts expected it would earn $1.75 per share in adjusted profits, according to Thomson Reuters Eikon.last_img read more

Still a long way to go in Canada Post contract dispute union

first_imgOTTAWA – The union representing 50,000 employees at Canada Post panned the latest contract offers from the corporation Thursday, calling them “disappointing” and keeping alive the threat of a work stoppage as the busy holiday online shopping season approaches.Two separate offers for rural and urban carriers included “very small movements” toward resolving some key issues, said the Canadian Union of Postal Workers.On a proposal directed at rural carriers, the union said, “We have a long way to go to achieve a negotiated collective agreement.”The possibility of a work stoppage has hovered over Canada Post since Sept. 26 after postal workers voted overwhelmingly in late summer in support of a potential walkout to back their contract demands.But that initial deadline passed without any job action being launched, with CUPW saying it would stay at the bargaining table so long as there was progress in the talks.That position had not changed Thursday, said CUPW national president Mike Palecek.“Those are discussions that we’re having daily, based on developments,” he said.Job action could include a full or partial walkout, or a lockout, after a 72-hour notice period.The threat of a work stoppage over the holidays has forced companies that rely on Canada Post for parcel deliveries to make alternative plans to ensure their customers receive orders. However, it may be difficult to fill all of the service gaps in the event of a shutdown.Canada Post is the biggest parcel shipping company in the country, having delivered about one million parcels per day during the holiday season last year — an increase of 20 per cent over the same period in 2016.Utilities have also been urging their clients to register for online billing, reminding them that invoices must still be paid regardless of whether they are mailed out.Canada Post said its global offers to rural and urban carriers include improvements to pay, benefits and job security.But the job security proposals are limited, particularly for rural and suburban carriers, CUPW said in a statement on its website.“For those eligible to job security, Canada Post would be allowed to assign you or not to a vacant position within a 75 km radius from your installation,” the union said.“This is a very complex proposal and a substantial amount of clarification is required to fully understand its impact.”Canada Post also rejected demands that those same carriers get paid an hourly rate — and for all hours worked — and that the corporation guarantee minimum hours, said CUPW.For both rural and urban carriers, the post office offered wage increases of 1.5 per cent annually under a four-year contract — virtually unchanged from proposals tabled Sept. 7. The union is seeking a 3.5 per cent hike in pay.“The offers are disappointing,” said Palecek.“Canada Post still hasn’t addressed any of our major issues.”CUPW has been pushing Canada Post to offer banking services in communities underserved by the big financial institutions.The Crown agency’s latest offer proposes “a selected set of new financial services,” a move Palecek described as encouraging.But he noted that no details about what those services might involve or when they could be launched have been forthcoming.last_img read more

Renault keeps Ghosn as CEO despite arrest in Japan

first_imgTOKYO — France’s Renault says it has decided to keep its CEO Carlos Ghosn on despite his arrest in Japan on allegations that he misused assets of partner Nissan Motor Co. and misreported his income.Renault’s board of directors announced late Tuesday that the No. 2 at the company, Thierry Bollore, would temporarily fill in for Ghosn.The French automaker said it would further consolidate its alliance with Nissan. The two automakers have a partnership, also, with smaller automaker Mitsubishi Motor Corp.There was no update Wednesday in Tokyo from prosecutors on Ghosn’s case, and no public word from Ghosn himself. It was unclear where he was being held.The Japanese and French governments have confirmed their support for the Renault-Nissan-Mitsubishi alliance, the industry leader with 10.6 million vehicles sold in 2017.The Associated Presslast_img read more

DeVos reinstates forprofit college watchdog cut under Obama

first_imgEducation Secretary Betsy DeVos is restoring federal recognition of an accrediting group that oversees dozens of for-profit colleges but was shut down by the Obama administration.Her decision released Wednesday says the Accrediting Council for Independent Colleges and Schools passed muster in 19 of 21 areas reviewed. DeVos says she is restoring the group’s recognition and giving it a year to fix lingering problems.The group, known as ACICS, was responsible for ensuring the quality of 250 institutions before the Obama administration cut ties with it in 2016, alleging poor oversight.It had previously certified now-defunct for-profit chains including Corinthian Colleges and ITT Technical Institute.A judge ordered DeVos to revisit the case in March after ACICS sued, saying the previous administration failed to consider thousands of pages of evidence.Collin Binkley, The Associated Presslast_img read more

General Motors product development chief named president

first_imgDETROIT — General Motors has promoted product development chief Mark Reuss (Royce) to company president.The longtime GM engineer replaces Dan Ammann, who is now CEO of GM’s autonomous vehicle unit called Cruise Automation.Reuss will continue to lead product development and the Cadillac luxury brand, which he took on last year. In his new job, he’ll also head the company’s quality organization.Reuss has been with the company for his entire career starting as an intern in 1983. In the past he has run operations in North America and Australia as well as GM’s engineering unit.GM says he has been leading a transformation of the company’s product development workforce to improve quality and speed up bringing new vehicles to market.The Associated Presslast_img read more